Tag Archives: Reading Greek

Subvocalization and Greek Speed Reading

Abram K-J asks a question concerning my previous post, which mentioned the key role of subvocalization in reading. Subvocalization is “saying” the words silently in your mind as you read them. When you do this, you “hear” the words and … Continue reading

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Do You Need to Speak Greek in Order to Read It? (SBL 2012 Report)

The annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature was held last week in Chicago. Over the next couple of posts I want to sum up some of the activities that our Applied Linguistics group hosted. Hopefully I do better on … Continue reading

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BibleWorks for Rapid Reading, pt 2 (BibleWorks 9 Review)

Introduction In this series I am exploring some ways that the new BibleWorks 9 can be used, not simply as a tool for exegesis or Bible study, but as an aid to communicative learning and teaching. For a good overview … Continue reading

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Brian Schultz on Reading Fluency in Hebrew and Greek

Brian Schultz, who teaches Biblical Hebrew communicately at Fresno Pacific University and is just an all-around nice guy, has posted some thoughts on what constitutes reading fluency and what helps or hinders its development. Check them out here. They dovetail rather … Continue reading

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James Davila Takes My Greek Quiz

A hearty εὐχαριστία to Jim Davila at PaleoJudaica, one of my favorite blogs, for mentioning my blog and the recent Greek quiz (see also here, where James McGrath notes our quiz). More than that, Prof Davila reports his results — … Continue reading

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The Oral/Aural Foundations of Reading (Basics of Greek Pedagogy, pt. 4)

About the Series This is part 4 in a series of posts laying out the problems with typical Koine Greek teaching methods and proposing a reformation in pedagogy. Part 1 talked about what it means to read Greek or any … Continue reading

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Greek Professors: Do They Know Greek? (Basics of Greek Pedagogy, pt. 3)

About the Series This is part 3 in a series of posts laying out the problems with typical Koine Greek teaching methods and proposing a reformation in pedagogy. Part 1 talked about what it means to read Greek or any … Continue reading

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What Does it Mean to “Read” Greek? (Basics of Greek Pedagogy, pt. 1)

By far the most common objection to oral/aural methods for teaching ancient Greek is the following: Greek is a dead language. We will never need to speak ancient Greek, so why should we waste time listening to and speaking it when … Continue reading

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