Tag Archives: Fluency

Demand Change!

You say you want a revolution in Greek teaching? I do too! But what is needed to bring about such a pedagogical reformation? I think the history of foreign language teaching in the United States can give us some idea. … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Naming the Movement

Every Movement Needs a Name I have often wondered how to name the movement (of which I am a part) to teach Koine Greek as a living language. I think every movement needs a good tag to be successful, one … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , | 24 Comments

Setting the Bar at Fluency, pt. 2 (SBL 2012 Report)

This is the fourth and final post in my report on the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, held Nov 17-20 in Chicago. Here are the first, second, and third parts. The rest of this post is the second half of … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

Setting the Bar at Fluency, pt. 1 (SBL 2012 Report)

This post is the third post in my report on the annual meeting for the Society of Biblical Literature, held Nov 17-20 in Chicago. Here are the first and second parts. In its second session, our Applied Linguistics group hosted a panel to address the question, “Where should we … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

A Standardized Test for Communicative Koine Greek (Needed Resources)

About the Series This is part of an ongoing series where I discuss resources that should be developed to aid teachers and students in acquiring Koine Greek communicatively. In this installment, I address the need for a standardized test for Koine … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Bible Software, Greek Tools, and a Future for Immersion (Basics of Greek Pedagogy, pt. 6)

About the Series This is part 6 in a series of posts laying out the problems with typical Koine Greek teaching methods and proposing a reformation in pedagogy. In the last post, I discussed the amount of time it takes to … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , | 19 Comments

What Does it Mean to “Read” Greek? (Basics of Greek Pedagogy, pt. 1)

By far the most common objection to oral/aural methods for teaching ancient Greek is the following: Greek is a dead language. We will never need to speak ancient Greek, so why should we waste time listening to and speaking it when … Continue reading

Posted in Greek Pedagogy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments